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Among those not surprised by ex-Norfolk Sheriff Bob McCabe’s conviction? His only sibling and oldest son

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The only thing more stunning than Bob McCabe’s sudden rise to power in Norfolk politics was his devastating fall from it.

The Norfolk native was a little-known, 35-year-old police detective on his third marriage and not making much money when he was elected sheriff in 1993, surprisingly beating a longtime incumbent.

He was soon hobnobbing with the city’s elite and powerful, enjoying a hefty salary and a comfortable life. His name recognition grew as he got involved in multiple charitable, civic and professional organizations. He easily won his next five elections.

But in late 2016, McCabe’s luck began to change.

He finished last in his bid for mayor, discovered he was under federal investigation and abruptly announced his resignation. The 11-count indictment that followed accused him of taking cash and gifts from two businessmen who had longtime contracts with the city’s jail in exchange for inside information and favorable treatment.

On Tuesday, a jury convicted McCabe, 63, of all counts at the end of a three-week trial in U.S. District Court in Norfolk. Judge Arenda Wright Allen immediately revoked his bond and scheduled sentencing for Jan. 21.

Among those not surprised by McCabe’s current circumstances are two family members: McCabe’s only sibling, an older brother named Tom; and the oldest of McCabe’s two children, a 39-year-old son named Brian. Both have long been estranged from the former sheriff.

“Bob always had a superiority complex,” Tom McCabe, 66, said. “He always wanted to be a big fish in a little pond.”

Tom McCabe, who lives in Norfolk, said his brother has refused to speak to him for the past 30 years, supposedly because of something the older brother said. The two didn’t even talk to each other at their father’s funeral in 2013.

Brian McCabe, who also lives in Norfolk and works in construction, said he hasn’t spoken to his father in years. He wouldn’t say how many or why.

And while both men said they don’t wish any ill will on McCabe, they believe he needs to face the consequences of his wrongdoing.

“I feel bad and it sucks,” Brian McCabe said of his father’s conviction and upcoming sentencing. “But it’s stuff he did and he has to be held accountable for his actions.”

Tom McCabe said he wasn’t surprised to hear his brother had refused to accept a plea deal. Prosecutors revealed at the start of the trial that one had been offered, but didn’t disclose the terms.

“Bobby’s pride would never let him plead guilty,” Tom McCabe said.

Bob McCabe declined to be interviewed for this story, according to a spokeswoman for Western Tidewater Regional Jail, where he was first sent after his conviction. He later was transferred to a facility “outside the area” for his own protection, said William Smith, the jail’s superintendent.

While the maximum McCabe could potentially get is 220 years in prison, federal sentencing guidelines are likely to call for far less.

Some local defense lawyers who regularly practice in federal court believe the guidelines — which take several factors into consideration — could recommend a term close to, or more than, 20 years. Judges can choose to go above or below the recommendation, but typically issue a sentence within the guidelines, they said.

While McCabe’s lack of prior convictions will weigh in his favor, the circumstances of his crimes, his lack of remorse, the number of years the crimes were committed, and the fact that he was a public official who abused his office will weigh against him, the lawyers said. His testimony at trial also likely will be considered obstruction of justice, they said.

As for his pension, McCabe could lose it. State law requires that government employees convicted of felonies associated with the performance of their job must forfeit their retirement benefits, but only if the convicted person’s employer requests that they be stopped. Because McCabe was a constitutionally elected official, it’s not clear who his “employer” would be.

James Broccoletti, McCabe’s defense lawyer, said he will appeal the convictions.

Among the issues the defense plans to raise is the judge’s decision to have McCabe and his co-defendant Gerard “Jerry” Boyle tried separately, which meant Boyle’s testimony couldn’t be offered at McCabe’s trial.

Boyle was the owner of Correct Care Solutions, then a Nashville-based company that provided medical services to Norfolk’s inmates for many years. He faces similar charges as McCabe and is scheduled for trial in October.

Boyle told federal investigators that anything he gave McCabe was “done only to promote good will” and was not offered with any expectations.

Broccoletti argued in court papers the testimony was crucial to McCabe’s defense, because it shows there was no “quid pro quo.”

Another appeal issue Broccoletti plans to raise is a ruling that allowed two witnesses to testify about statements they said were made to them by a sheriff’s office official, Norman Hughey, who died in 2019.

The witnesses said Hughey, who’d served as undersheriff, told them McCabe asked him to provide inside information about competitor’s bids to Boyle’s company — but Hughey refused.

Broccoletti argued in court papers it was wrong to allow the witnesses to testify about the statements because the defense couldn’t cross examine a dead man. The defense lawyer also contended Hughey had motivation to lie because he believed McCabe had forced him to retire from the department.

Jane Harper, 757-222-5097, jane.harper@pilotonline.com



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Police: 2 dead, 4 injured in Boise, Idaho, mall shooting

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Police: 2 dead, 4 injured in Boise, Idaho, mall shooting



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When Should You Drink Your Last Coffee of the Day?

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ProFootball Talk on NBC Sports

Replay official Carl Madsen died at 71 on Sunday

The NFL announced that replay official Carl Madsen died on Sunday at the age of 71. Madsen died on his way home after working the Week Seven game between the Titans and Chiefs. He had spent the last 12 years as a replay official and had previously spent 12 years as an on-field official. “Carl [more]



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A fire broke out on a cargo ship after about 40 shipping containers fell overboard due to rough seas off the coast of Vancouver Island

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Imagery captured of located containers from U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Port Angeles helicopter. US Coast Guard

  • Around 40 shipping containers went overboard when a cargo ship hit rough seas on Friday.

  • A fire broke out Saturday on the same ship, the Zim Kingston, while anchored near Vancouver Island.

  • US and Canadian officials are monitoring the situation, including some containers with “hazardous materials.”

A fire broke out Saturday on a cargo ship, known as the Zim Kingston, that had lost around 40 shipping containers off the coast of Canada’s Vancouver Island the day before, officials said.

The US Coast Guard said in a tweet Friday they were monitoring adrift shipping containers that went overboard after an inbound vessel en route to Canada encountered rough seas. Photos shared by the coast guard showed some of the shipping containers afloat in the open ocean.

The US Coast Guard said Friday 35 floating containers had been located. As of Saturday, five had still not been located, and officials were warning other vessels to be extremely cautious in the area as the containers “may be partially submerged and not visible,” the Vancouver Sun reported.

The Canadian Coast Guard told the outlet some of the containers that fell held hazardous materials, and that the agency would assess for any “pollution threats and hazards.”

A day after the containers fell from the Zim Kingston, a fire broke out on the ship while it was anchored near Victoria, according to the Canadian Coast Guard. The agency told CHEK News reporter Jasmine Bala the fire started in damaged containers that were still onboard.

The Canadian Coast Guard told Bala two of the six containers that are on fire contain “hazardous material.” They also said 10 crew members were evacuated while 11 remain on the ship, with no reports of injuries.

In a warning to other vessels, the Canadian Coast Guard established an emergency zone around the Zim Kingston, saying: “The ship is on fire and expelling toxic gas. Two fallen containers are floating in the vicinity of the vessel. Caution.”

Read the original article on Business Insider





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Obama criticizes Youngkin in Va. governor’s race

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Reuters

Obama fires up Virginia crowd for governor’s race he calls a U.S. “turning point”

RICHMOND, Va. (Reuters) -Former U.S. President Barack Obama urged Virginians to re-elect Terry McAuliffe as governor at a rally on Saturday, emphasizing the race’s significance as an indicator of the country’s political direction and a reflection of its values. Obama and McAuliffe, who served as the state’s governor from 2014 to 2018, spoke before a cheering crowd at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond with just 10 days to go before the closely watched, tight Nov. 2 election. Obama told the crowd the Virginia election represented a national “turning point,” where Americans could either become more embattled in the divisive politics that characterized Republican Donald Trump’s presidency and which culminated in an attack by Trump’s supporters on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, or “pull together” to “solve big problems.”



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Fans can’t get over Will Poulter’s transformation as he prepares for Marvel role

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Will Poulter is surprising fans with his buff new look.

The former child star is preparing for his role as Marvel superhero Adam Warlock in director James Gunn’s upcoming “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3” — and it’s no exaggeration to say Poulter is looking muscled up in his latest Instagram video.

The “Dopesick” actor’s fans are taking notice of his physical transformation, with one admirer posting a video on TikTok featuring before-and-after shots of Poulter. “I can’t believe this glow-up,” the fan wrote.

More fans responded to celebrate Poulter’s new chiseled look on Twitter, with one wondering, “sorry when did will poulter get sexy????”

“Holy moly. It *is* true. Will Poulter got jacked,” gushed another.

“omg he looks like hemsworth, someone else chimed in.

Poulter found fame at age 15 after playing Lee Carter in the 2008 movie “Son of Rambow.” After appearing alongside Jason Sudeikis and Jennifer Aniston in the 2013 comedy “We’re the Millers,” the London-born actor went on to star in the sci-fi flick “The Maze Runner” (2014). He also turned in notable performances in “The Revenant” (2015), “Black Mirror: Bandersnatch” (2018), and the critically acclaimed horror movie “Midsommar” (2019).

Gunn confirmed on Twitter that Poulter had won the role of Adam Warlock in “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3,” writing on Oct. 11, “As you guys know I often strike down false rumors, so … um … Welcome to the Guardians family, Will Poulter. He’s an amazing actor and wonderful guy.”

Poulter responded to say he was thrilled to appear in the movie, which is scheduled to hit theaters in May 2023. “Thank you, James. It’s a genuine honour to play this role and to work with you. I’m very excited to get to work,” the English actor wrote.

Just one week later, a reporter for the movie and entertainment blog Flip Your Wig asked Poulter if he was ready to “flex” some serious superhero muscle.

“I better get ready, I guess,” he responded, adding, “Working on it, working on it.”

CORRECTION (Oct. 23, 2021, 1:15 p.m.): An earlier version of this article misstated the age Poulter found fame. He was 15 when the 2008 movie “Son of Rambow” was released.

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Video emerges of Alec Baldwin’s ‘Rust’ co-star Jensen Ackles speaking about the production’s firearm training days before fatal set shooting

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Actor Jensen Ackles. Leon Bennett/WireImage

  • “Rust” actor Jensen Ackles discussed firearms training days before a fatal on-set shooting.

  • In a video, Ackles said he was asked by a prop master to fire “off a couple of rounds” on the set.

  • Cinematographer Halyna Hutchins was fatally shot on the “Rust” set on Thursday.

A video depicting Alec Baldwin’s “Rust” co-star Jensen Ackles discussing the firearms training he received on the film’s set days before the cinematographer Halyna Hutchins was fatally shot during filming has surfaced online.

In the video, which has now been deleted in many places but remains available on Youtube and TikTok, Ackles describes a brief training session he had with the film’s armorer – the technical crew member responsible for prop firearms.

The clip was filmed between Oct. 15-17 when Ackles’ appeared at a fan event in Denver for his show Supernatural, according to Deadline.

“They had me pick my gun, they were like, ‘Alright, what gun would you like?’ and I was like, ‘I don’t know,'” Ackles can be seen saying in the view.

He continued: “The armorer was like, ‘Do you have gun experience?’ I was like, ‘A little.’ And she’s like, ‘Okay, well, this is how you load it, this is how we check it and make sure it’s safe.'”

Ackles added that the armorer said she was “going to put some blanks” into the gun. He was then instructed to practice for his scene by firing “off a couple of rounds” into the distance.

“I walk out, and she’s like, ‘Just make sure you pull the hammer all the way back and aim at your target,’ I was like, ‘All right, I got it,'” he said.

No information has been released by authorities that links Jensen to the fatal shooting on the film’s set. It is also not clear whether the same armorer Jensen referenced in the video had worked with Alec Baldwin, who discharged the prop gun that killed 42-year-old cinematographer Halyna Hutchins.

Multiple reports have confirmed that the gun Alec Baldwin discharged on the film’s set held “live rounds.” According to an affidavit, Baldwin was handed the gun by an assistant director, who said “cold gun,” The New York Times and the Associated Press reported. The term refers to a gun that is not loaded with live rounds.

In a statement given to Insider on Friday, Hutchins’ husband, Matthew, reacted to his wife’s death.

“I don’t think there are words to communicate the situation,” Matthew Hutchins, 38, said. “I am not going to be able to comment about the facts or the process of what we’re going through right now, but I appreciate that everyone has been very sympathetic.”

He added, “I think that we will need a little bit of time before we can really encapsulate her life in a way that is easy to communicate.”

Read the original article on Insider



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Every Day, Biden Smells Like More of a Loser

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Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty

With a hint of confusion in his eyes and a whiff of failure in the air around him, Joe Biden is watching his approval ratings continue to plummet to the point where just 42 percent of Americans approve of his job performance.

Which makes sense, since at least so far Biden really doesn’t seem very good at this whole being president thing despite dreaming of and preparing for it for decades. With his staff trying to hide him from the press, and his penchant for saying confusing things, Biden isn’t rhetorically equipped to talk himself out of this mess. He was elected on a simple mandate to not be Trump, but after promising not to do Trump things, doing his own thing has proven more difficult.

To some degree, he put himself in this corner. By governing as he campaigned (as a competent centrist), Biden might have locked in a governing majority of alienated center-right Americans along with his extant Democratic coalition. However, Biden chose to abandon efforts to transcend the current political paradigm, choosing instead to appease his base. Talk about a tragic plot twist.

His deference to progressives was foreshadowed early on: first when he flip-flopped on taxpayer funding of abortion during the campaign, and then with the partisan passage of his COVID-relief bill in February. But real trouble arrived this summer, when he prematurely declared “independence” from the virus (followed by mixed messaging over boosters), and his Afghanistan withdrawal went dangerously sideways. Then it became clear that allowing progressives to hold his bipartisan infrastructure bill hostage would result in more than just a temporary delay.

One could argue that Biden’s decision to pander to the leftward flank of the Democratic Party caused or exacerbated the various crises he now confronts—ranging from the border crisis (his “compassionate” policies and rhetoric served as a magnet) to violent crime (it’s hard to blame Biden for this, though his party’s “defund the police” rhetoric didn’t help) to inflation, which is now tied with COVID as Americans’ biggest concern (Biden ignored Larry Summers’ warnings about overheating the economy). The current stalemate over his legislative agenda is the clearest example of this deference to progressives. And since his stalled legislative agenda feels especially like a self-inflicted wound, it’s worth spending a little additional time here.

This One Basic Mistake Is Blowing Up Biden’s Presidency

Had Biden aggressively moved to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill, he would likely have garnered dozens of Republican votes, and progressives would have likely either caved to his will or been shown to be impotent. This is my counterfactual analysis, at least.

Instead, though, Biden let progressives press him into (sort of) linking passage of the bipartisan bill with a $3.5 trillion social welfare reconciliation package. By trying to have it all, there’s now a chance that he could get neither.

Why would an experienced former senator and vice president—who spent his career working across the aisle—make this mistake? Here’s one hypothesis: Ideas have consequences. And the assertion has taken root that Americans are so polarized and ideologically sorted that persuasion is a fool’s errand.

Since Bill Clinton, every U.S. president has essentially bought into this premise, despite all of them except Trump having explicitly campaigned as game-changing uniters. Bush and Obama won re-election with this formula, which probably explains why it isn’t easily abandoned, even as the trajectory of America this time at least feels like it has been headed downard. Biden had a fresh opportunity to break the cycle, but he has instead followed the path of his predecessors.

That aside, his even more fundamental problem is a lack of competence. We saw this in Afghanistan, where the dubious decision to withdraw all U.S. troops was compounded by the hamfisted manner in which the withdrawal was executed. And this same lack of competence is evident when it comes to Biden’s stalled legislative agenda.

If Biden was going to make the foolish decision to link the bipartisan infrastructure bill with the reconciliation bill, he could have first made sure he had all 50 Democratic Senators on board.

It’s no surprise that Manchin, who hails from West Virginia, would pose a roadblock when it comes to passing the Democrats’ “green” agenda items, so discussions with him should have begun on day one. Instead, Biden and the Democrats tried to jam their own framework through—and retroactively sell it to him.

Of course, it’s even more complicated, since Arizona Sen. Krysten Sinema is the other holdout. Unlike previous examples where duos like recalcitrant Republican Sens. Susan Collins and Olympia Snowe of Maine could be won over simultaneously, Manchin’s problems with the bill (mainly climate related) are entirely different from Sinema’s (generally having to do with taxes). And don’t forget the fact that appeasing them too much could alienate other, more progressive, Democratic votes. This is just one big mess.

And the problem for Biden (and America) is that the problems keep piling up. China is menacing Taiwan and testing hypersonic weapons (Biden says we will defend Taiwan if they are attacked). Gas prices are up, with Biden admitting they’re not coming down any time soon. And then there is the ongoing supply chain crisis.

Biden’s problems are piling up so fast that it reminds me of lyrics from Hank Williams, Jr., “The interest is up and the stock market’s down. And you only get mugged if you go downtown.”

Those lyrics, recorded in 1981, reflected those dark times. It’s worth noting that Ronald Reagan went on to win 49 states, three years later.

Joe Biden better hope for a similar turnaround.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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