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TuSimple addresses autonomous truck crash during Q2 earnings call – TechCrunch

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Autonomous trucking company TuSimple used its second-quarter earnings call to address an April crash during which one of the company’s autonomous trucks suddenly veered across the I-10 highway in Tuscon, slamming into a concrete barricade. 

The crash first came to light via a YouTube video that showed footage of the crash along with a letter from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), dated May 26, alerting TuSimple to a “safety compliance investigation.” The accident was later reported on by The Wall Street Journal

“An error occurred when a test driver and safety engineer tried to reenter autonomous driving mode before the system computer was primed to do so, and the truck swerved, making contact with the highway barrier,” said Xiaodi Hou, TuSimple co-founder and CEO, during Tuesday’s earnings call. “No one was hurt. And the only evidence of the accident are a few scrapes and some minor damages on our truck.”

Hou noted that in the past seven years, TuSimple had accumulated 8.1 million miles of road testing with “precisely one incident.” When the incident happened on April 6, TuSimple grounded the entire fleet and began an independent investigation, said Hou. After determining the cause of the error, the company then upgraded all of its systems with an overhaul of its human machine interface to make sure the same problem would never happen again, the executive continued. 

That internal report, which was reviewed by WSJ, revealed that the truck abruptly swerved left due to an outdated command, which was 2.5 minutes old and should have been erased from the system but wasn’t. 

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University told WSJ that common safeguards, had they been in place, would have prevented the crash. For example, the truck shouldn’t be responding to a command that’s even a couple hundredths of a second old, let alone more than two minutes old. The system also shouldn’t be able to turn so sharply while traveling at 65 miles per hour, nor should a safety driver be able to engage a self-driving system that’s not properly functioning. 

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has since joined the FMCSA’s investigation into the TuSimple highway crash.

Hou said that the two agencies have yet to find any anomalies in their investigation or give TuSimple any safety recommendations, but the investigation is not yet complete. 

During the earnings call, TuSimple repeated its plans to commercialize driver-out operations, in which no human safety operator is present in the vehicle. The company first completed a driver-out demonstration along an 80-mile stretch in Arizona in December, and has completed several more runs since. 

TuSimple said the crash wouldn’t affect its plans to begin driver-out operations for Union Pacific Railroad, but it’s unclear if the company is even on schedule for that at present. TuSimple was meant to launch fully autonomous freight hauling for Union Pacific in the spring of this year and scale to commercial viability by the end of 2023, but Hou said the company has encountered a complete road closure in front of the distribution center at its destination point, which has delayed the run by “a couple of weeks.” He also reiterated that the company’s deadline for driver-out in Texas is set for 2023, but did not specify if those will be initial test runs or fully commercial operations. TuSimple did not respond in time for requests for clarification.

TuSimple Q2 financials

TuSimple’s total revenue was $2.6 million in the second quarter, which is up 73% year-over-year and 13% sequentially. Wall Street analysts expected TuSimple’s revenues to come in at $4.06 million; moreover, they expected the company to beat those estimates. 

The company attributed its growth, such as it was, to increased utilization of existing assets and year-over-year price increases. 

TuSimple’s net loss came in at $108.6 million, versus $116.5 million in the same quarter of last year. The company appears to have slimmed down on total operating expenses, which came in at $107.5 million this quarter versus $119.4 million last year. However, R&D spending was up 13% year-over-year at $85.5 million. TuSimple said the largest portion of R&D expense was $60.8 million related to hiring, including a stock-based compensation expense of $22.4 million. That said, sales, general and administrative spend was significantly lower than last year. 

To prepare for driver-out operations and to expand its autonomous freight network, TuSimple invested a total of $3.8 million in purchases of property and equipment. The company ended the quarter with $1.16 billion in cash. 

Updated full-year guidance

TuSimple’s updated guidance on 2022 revenue remained unchanged at $9 million to $11 million. Generally, the company intends to spend less, and therefore lose less money this year. TuSimple’s adjusted EBITDA loss for the year is now expected to be between $360 million and $380 million, versus previous guidance of $400 million to $420 million. 

In addition, TuSimple will spend less on stock-based compensation — attributable to a hiring slowdown — as well as purchases of property and equipment. The company is hoping to end the year with $950 million in cash versus previous guidance of $900 million. 

Executive shakeups

Hou touched on some key leadership changes that had been announced in June, including chief financial officer Patrick Dillon leaving the company, to be temporarily replaced by Eric Tapia, TuSimple’s global controller and principal accounting officer. 

In addition, Dr. Ersin Yumer, previously head of TuSimple’s autonomous freight network, was promoted to EVP of operations, and Dr. Lei Wang was promoted to EVP of technology. Both were promoted to support TuSimple’s driver-out operations. 

Worth noting

It’s worth noting that TuSimple would not address a question about the company’s tentative plans to sell off its China operations, something that was touched on during the first-quarter earnings call. 

At the time, TuSimple told TechCrunch that the company’s stock price today doesn’t reflect the value of the China autonomous freight business, so it would be a good idea to split off APAC operations. A perusal through the company’s 10-Q revealed TuSimple is more likely looking to sell its China operations because it’s too expensive to keep it going, given the National Security Agreement the company agreed to as part of a review by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. 

Tapia, TuSimple’s interim CFO, also shared that the company is in the process of upgrading most of its older trucks to its newest AV hardware technology, a process which will continue through 2023 and will involve adding upgraded sensors to the vehicles. 

“While we plan to introduce some new trucks into the fleet, our ability to add a significant number of trucks is difficult, given the challenges in purchasing new or even slightly used trucks,” said Tapia. “Lastly, we plan to continue to invest in adding terminals to the [autonomous freight network], primarily around the Texas triangle. Our intention is to do this in a capital-light manner, partnering when possible.” 

In 2020, TuSimple partnered with Navistar to build fully autonomous trucks, and has previously set a deadline to begin manufacturing by 2024 and deliver to certain customers, like DHL, by 2025. Hou and Tapia dodged one analyst’s repeated attempts to get clarity on this timeline.



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Galaxy Digital calls off $1.2 billion acquisition of BitGo – TechCrunch

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Crypto sector’s first $1 billion deal, announced at the height of record surge in token prices, is disbanding as the market reverses much of the gains.

Galaxy Digital said Monday it has terminated the $1.2 billion proposed acquisition of crypto custodian BitGo, a high-profile deal they announced in May last year, after the San Francisco-based startup failed to provide its audited financial statements for the year 2021.

BitGo’s alleged failure to provide the financial statements by July 31 violated the terms the two firms had agreed upon last year, Galaxy Digital said in a public statement, adding that the termination of the deal won’t incur the company any fee. Shares of Galaxy Digital, which trades in Toronto, jumped on the news.

The proposed acquisition — which was proposed to include Galaxy Digital issuing 33.8 million new shares, and a $265 million cash component — was supposed to be crypto sector’s first $1 billion deal. The BitGo purchase was positioned to help Galaxy Digital broaden its offerings for institutional investors by adding services such as investment banking, prime lending and tax services. BitGo counts Galaxy Digital, Goldman Sachs, Valor Equity Partners, Craft Ventures, DRW and Redpoint Ventures among its backers.

“The power of the technology, solutions, and people we will have as a result of this acquisition will unlock unique value for our clients and drive long-term growth for our combined business. We are excited to welcome Mike Belshe and the talented BitGo team to Galaxy Digital,” Mike Novogratz, chief executive officer and founder of Galaxy Digital, said at the time.

Novogratz (pictured above) said Monday: “Galaxy remains positioned for success and to take advantage of strategic opportunities to grow in a sustainable manner. We are committed to continuing our process to list in the U.S. and providing our clients with a prime solution that truly makes Galaxy a one-stop shop for institutions.”

The announcement follows Galaxy Digital reporting a second-quarter loss of $554.7 million, up from a loss of $183 million a year ago, earlier this month. In the company’s earnings call, Novogratz said Galaxy Digital had about $1 billion in cash on hand.

Galaxy Digital said today it is waiting for the SEC’s review and stock exchange approval for a Nasdaq listing.



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Uber to sunset free loyalty program in favor of subscription membership – TechCrunch

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Ride-hailing giant Uber is shutting down its free loyalty program, Uber Rewards, so it can focus on its subscription-based Uber One membership.

Uber first launched the rewards program in 2018 as a sort of frequent flyer scheme that allowed riders to earn points for every dollar spent on rides or Uber Eats deliveries. Those points could then be used to get discounts on future rides or deliveries. In November 2021, Uber began introducing Uber One, which, for $9.99 per month or $99.99 annually, allows members perks like 5% off certain rides or delivery orders and unlimited $0 delivery fees on food orders of over $15 and grocery orders of over $30.

In an email sent to customers that was picked up by The Verge, Uber said users can still earn points via the legacy rewards program until the end of August, and that they can redeem those points until October 31. Uber Rewards will officially shut down on November 1, 2022, according to an update posted by the company.

The Uber Rewards program allowed users to earn 1x point for every Uber Pool dollar spent, 2x for every UberX dollar spent and 3x for every $1 spent on Premium. The number of points accumulated would put members into different castes of loyalty, from Blue to Gold to Platinum to Diamond, the latter of which comes with benefits like access to highly rated drivers, free delivery on three Uber Eats orders, access to better customer service and free upgrades.

While phone support will continue for Diamond users, now the only way to get additional perks with Uber will be to shell out for a subscription. Existing Rewards members will get a free one-month subscription to Uber One, but then will be charged for access. If you’re someone who orders Uber Eats more than twice a month, you can easily break even with the Uber One subscription, but plenty of users might not see the money saving benefits in the switch.

Uber did not respond immediately for clarity as to why it is shutting down the Rewards program in favor of the Uber One membership. Perhaps the company did not see the returns and user loyalty that it would have expected from the program and thinks a subscription offering will provide better returns.



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As companies fight to retain talent, employee benefits startups might escape cost cuts – TechCrunch

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How will employee benefits startups fare when their corporate customers start slashing costs as the market goes downhill? We’re going to find out if current trends continue.

There was a spike in the number of startups offering employee benefits services through a B2B2C model last year, as nearly every company focused on employee benefits amid the Great Resignation in an effort to retain and attract talent. These startups sell everything from paid care leave coordination and fertility services to discounted gym memberships to consumers through their employers.

But the freewheeling spending of 2021 is now over, and some of these startups could find their offered services on the chopping block if market conditions continue to worsen.

If there is indeed a recession on the horizon, many of these startups would be right to fear for their future growth, but Brian Kropp, chief of HR research at Gartner, doesn’t think this downturn will mirror the last. Kropp told TechCrunch that even if the market enters a recession, it won’t be similar to what we saw in 2008 because of the ongoing labor shortage.



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You’re not that special (I swear, there’s a startup angle here) – TechCrunch

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Welcome to Startups Weekly, a fresh human-first take on this week’s startup news and trends. To get this in your inbox, subscribe here.

For longtime Startups Weekly readers, you’ll remember that edtech used to be my primary beat. Like, day one beat. Most of my coverage was focused on edtech’s rise in the early innings of the pandemic, the unicorn mad rush and even some IPOs. Duolingo continues to be the company that I know the most about, mostly because I wrote thousands of words about its savvy owl and wild founding story.

While I’m more focused on fintech these days, I was curious if edtech is still a big deal or if the sector — like most during the downturn — is facing a reset. This week, I interviewed seven leading venture capitalists who have a focus on education technology to better understand how the sector is faring during the downturn.

The big takeaway? Edtech is facing a reality check in the form of discipline. Investors explained that the whole startup ecosystem is slower this year; edtech is no different. If anything, as USV’s Rebecca Kaden put it, “The boom in the category in the last couple years means most of our education-focused portfolio is funded quite well [ … ] rounds would be opportunistic rather than out of need, and most are focused on building their businesses for the next couple years.”

As Kaden describes, it’s time to focus and edtech, luckily, has the capital to do it. It makes me think a bit about advice that my friend often gives our friend group: We’re not that special, and that’s a good thing. He means in the kindest way, and the lesson there is that feelings of change, stress or anxiety are not as deep as we may think when we first feel them. What we’re experiencing is shared by other people in their mid-20s, or, well, other sectors in startup land right now. All that matters is if you’ve invested in yourself long enough before the spotlight turns on that when the lights go down, you’re still there. Just quieter and maybe focused a bit more on backstage.

Anyway, for the full survey, read my TechCrunch+ piece: “7 investors discuss why edtech startups must go back to basics to survive.” You can also check out my accompanying analysis, “Edtech isn’t special anymore, and that’s a good thing.” 

In the rest of this newsletter, we’ll get into one Haus’ closed doors, SoftBank execution fund and a pitch deck teardown you don’t want to miss. As always, you can support me by forwarding this newsletter to a friend or following me on Twitter

Bring the Haus down

I wrote about Haus, a buzzy VC-backed aperitif company going up for sale in light of a collapsed Series A. CEO and co-founder Helena Price Hambrecht spoke to TechCrunch about what went down between the company and its potential lead investor, the reasoning they got behind the fallen deal and what’s next.

Here’s what’s important: I’ve never seen an entrepreneur so transparent about the challenges, and unfortunate outcomes, that happen within startups. Here’s an excerpt from my interview with her.

“It’s always dangerous to be low on cash. We got there, and it’s unfortunate, but I know there are many companies in this position right now,” Hambrecht says. “I have been sharing my work online for over 20 years now. It’s definitely something in my DNA. If me sharing this process is helpful for another founder in a tough spot and considering their options, then it makes all of this a little more worth it.”

As for what’s next for the entrepreneur, a Silicon Valley branding veteran, there’s no immediate plans to jump into a new startup.

“My goal, right now, is to be as helpful as I can to make this ABC process have the best outcome possible. After that, I’m going to take some time to process the last four years; it’s been so extraordinary, as well as brutal and traumatic; I’m going to rest and process that.”

Image Credits: MirageC (opens in a new window) / Getty Images

So, when is the SoftBank Execution Fund III dropping?

This week on Equity, your favorite trio dug into the numbers and nuance behind the headlines. It meant SoftBank, Coinbase and deals from ByteDance, Haus and Axios.

Here’s why it’s important: Part of the conversation hovered around SoftBank’s losses on losses, which was really the highlight of the show. Do we see a redemption arc forming for one of the biggest, buzziest investors of the past few years? And what does Tiger Global think? So many questions, and it’s always fun to get Mary Ann and Alex’s take.

SoftBank Group President Masayoshi Son Keynote Address at The JCI World Congress

Image Credits: Kiyoshi Ota / Bloomberg / Getty Images

Pitch Deck Teardown: Five Flute’s $1.2M pre-seed deck

TC’s Haje Jan Kamps is back with another pitch deck teardown, this time looking at the deck that helped Five Flute raise a $1.2 million pre-seed round.

Here’s why it’s important: If you haven’t been following along with this series, you’re — and I mean this in the kindest way — missing out. Haje goes slide by slide, and in this case, taught me a lot about why more can be more in terms of length of deck and why a “chockablock of words” is a top mistake founders make. Read the story here and pitch Haje for the series if you so dare.

If you missed last week’s newsletter

Read it here: “Venture investors to founders: Turn down for what?” We also have a companion podcast out, which you can listen to here: “Founders, whales and the sea change in the entrepreneurial energy.”

Seen on TechCrunch

Coinbase’s earnings fall short of expectations as crypto winter rages

Finix raises $30 million as fintech’s spotlight picks its sides

Mark Cuban, Mavericks in hot water over Voyager ‘Ponzi scheme’

Cloud security startup Wiz reaches $100M ARR in just 18 months

Seen on TechCrunch+

The best cloud unicorns aren’t as overvalued as you might think

Some frank advice for open source startups seeking product-market fit

How digital health startups are navigating the post-Roe legal landscape

Same time, same place, next week? Talk soon,

N



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Twilio gets hacked, teens ditch Facebook, and SpaceX takes South Korea to the moon – TechCrunch

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Hi again! Welcome back to Week in Review, the newsletter where we quickly recap the top stories from TechCrunch dot-com this week. Want it in your inbox every Saturday? Sign up here.

Is Facebook for old people? If you’ve got a teenager around the house, you’ve probably heard them say as much. The most read story this week is on a Pew study that suggests this generation of teens has largely abandoned the platform in favor of Instagram/YouTube/TikTok/etc.; whereas in 2014 around 71% of teens used Facebook, the study says in 2022 that number has dropped down to 32%.

other stuff

Mark Cuban sued over crypto platform promotion: “A group of Voyager Digital customers filed a class-action suit in Florida federal court against Cuban, as well as the basketball team he owns, the Dallas Mavericks,” writes Anita, “alleging their promotion of the crypto platform resulted in more than 3.5 million investors losing $5 billion collectively.”

A troubling layoff trend: While tech layoffs might, maybe, hopefully be showing signs of slowing, Natasha M points out a troubling trend: some companies are announcing layoffs only to announce another round of layoffs just weeks or months later.

SpaceX launches South Korea’s first moon mission: South Korea has launched its first-ever lunar mission — a lunar orbiter “launched atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket” ahead of plans to land on the surface some time in 2030.

Twilio gets hacked: While it’s unclear exactly what data was taken, Twilio says the data of at least 125 customers was accessed after some of its employees were tricked “into handing over their corporate login credentials” by an intense SMS phishing attack.

Amazon’s bizarre new show: Think “America’s Funniest Home Videos,” but made up of user-submitted footage from Ring security cameras. By now most people probably realize their every step is recorded on a security camera or three — but doesn’t embracing it as Entertainment™ like this feel kind of…icky?

Haus hits hard times: Haus, a company that ships specialized low-alcohol drinks direct to consumers, is looking for a buyer after a major investor backed out of its Series A. The challenge? Investor diligence for an alcohol company can take months, and Haus just doesn’t “have the cash to support continued operations at this time.”

Image Credits: Haus

audio stuff

How clean is the air you breathe every day? Aclima co-founder Davida Herzl wants everyone to be able to answer that question, and sat down with Jordan and Darrell on this week’s Found podcast to explain her mission. Meanwhile on Chain Reaction, Jacquelyn and Anita explain the U.S. gov’s crackdown of the cryptocurrency mixer Tornado Cash, and the Equity crew spent Wednesday’s show discussing whether the turbulent market conditions of late will mean we see fewer early-stage endeavors in the months ahead.

additional stuff

What lies behind the paywall? A lot of really good stuff! Here’s what TechCrunch+ subscribers were reading most this week…

Building an MVP when you can’t code: Got a great idea but can’t code? You can still get the ball rolling. Magnus Grimeland, founder of the early-stage VC firm Antler, lays out some of the key principles to keep in mind.

Are SaaS valuations staging a recovery?: “…the good news for software startup founders,” writes Alex, “is that the period when the deck was being increasingly stacked against them may now be behind us.”

VCs and AI-powered investment tools: Do VCs want AI-powered tools to help them figure out where to put their money? Kyle Wiggers takes a look at the concept, and why not all VCs are on board with it.



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Digital pensions platform Penfold raises $8.5M Series A led by Bridford Group – TechCrunch

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Penfold, a digital pensions platform, has closed a £7m ($8.49m) Series A funding round led by Bridford Group, an investment group.

Also participating in the round was Jeremy Coller, Chief Investment Officer and Chairman of Coller Capital. Penfold also raised additional funding via a crowdfund amongst its customer base. The cash will be used to expand Penfold’s workplace pension division.

Chris Eastwood, Co-Founder at Penfold, commented (in a statement): “It’s been a big year for Penfold – from launching our workplace pension offering, to reaching £100m AUA.”

Bridford Group, lead investor, commented: “The pensions industry represents a huge market – with £8trn in savings in the UK alone. Despite this, many people remain uninterested and unengaged in their pensions. With so many people not saving enough, there’s a real opportunity for a new provider to step in.” 



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After the FBI raid at Mar-a-Lago, online threats quickly turn into real-world violence – TechCrunch

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Threats of violence reached a fever pitch — reminiscent of the days leading up to the Capitol attack — following the news that the FBI raided Trump’s Florida beach club to retrieve classified documents the former president may have unlawfully taken there.

After Trump himself confirmed Monday’s raid at Mar-a-Lago, pro-Trump pundits and politicians rallied around declarations of “war,” and Trump’s ever-fervent supporters called for everything from dismantling the federal law enforcement agency to committing acts of violence against its agents. The situation escalated from there in record time, with online rhetoric boiling over quickly into real-world violence.

By Thursday, an armed man identified as Ricky Shiffer attempted to force his way into an FBI office in Cincinnati, Ohio, brandishing a rifle before fleeing. Law enforcement pursued Shiffer and he was fatally shot during the ensuing standoff with police.

Analysts with the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD), a nonprofit that researches extremism and disinformation, found evidence that Shiffer was driven to commit violence by “conspiratorial beliefs related to former President Trump and the 2020 election…interest in killing federal law enforcement, and the recent search warrant executed at Mar-a-Lago earlier this week.” He was also reportedly present at the January 6 attack — another echo between this week’s escalating online threats and the tensions that culminated in political violence at the Capitol that day.

Shiffer appears to have been active on both Twitter and Truth Social, the platform from Trump’s media company that hosts the former president and his supporters. As Thursday’s attack unfolded, Shiffer appeared to post to Truth Social about how his plan to infiltrate the FBI office by breaking through a ballistic glass barrier with a nail gun had gone awry. “Well, I thought I had a way through bullet proof glass, and I didn’t,” the account posted Thursday morning. “If you don’t hear from me, it is true I tried attacking the F.B.I., and it’ll mean either I was taken off the internet, the F.B.I. got me, or they sent the regular cops…”

In posts on Truth Social, the account implored others to “be ready to kill the enemy” and “kill the FBI on sight” in light of Monday’s raid at Mar-a-Lago. It also urged followers to heed a “call to arms” to arm themselves and prepare for combat. “If you know of any protests or attacks, please post here,” the account declared earlier this week.

By Friday, that account was removed from the platform and a search of Shiffer’s name mostly surfaced content denouncing his actions. “Why did you censor #rickyshiffer‘s profile? So much for #truth and #transparency,” one Truth Social user posted on Friday. Still, online conspiracies around the week’s events remain in wide circulation on Truth Social and elsewhere, blaming antifa for the attack on the Ohio FBI office, accusing the agency of planting documents at Mar-a-Lago and sowing unfounded fears that well-armed IRS agents will descend on Americans in light of Friday’s House passage of the Inflation Reduction Act.

“‘Violence against law enforcement is not the answer no matter what anybody is upset about or who they’re upset with,’ FBI director Christopher Wray said in light of emerging threats of violence this week. Trump appointed Wray to the role in 2017 after infamously ousting former FBI director James Comey.”

Friday is also the five-year anniversary of the Unite the Right rally, which saw white nationalists clad in Nazi imagery marching openly through the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia. The ensuing events left 32-year-old protester Heather Heyer dead and sent political shockwaves through a nation that had largely grown complacent about the simmering threat of white supremacist violence.



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